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Sunday, March 16, 2008

Bulb Watch 2008 - March 15

The first of the new bulbs I plants last Fall are emerging! SUCCESS!

So far I spotted 3 plants emerging through the matted leaves where I planted a whole bunch of bulbs last Fall. In this area I know I planted tulips and hyacinths of varying bloom times; I even experimented with layering them in the same hole. I have a feeling these will be the hyacinths. Kate commented about squirrels ferreting away bulbs and eating them ... I had no idea they do this, but I have a feeling that they ate some of my bulbs because I noticed some "holes" where I had planted them.
March 14 - the first shoot

And bulb shoots aren't the only thing I found out there ...
There is more rabbit crap out in my gardens than ever before. It's pretty disgusting.

6 comments:

IBOY said...

My favorite time of the whole gardening year is poking around in the dead leaves, looking at all the bulbs just peeking up, seeing if they came back, or figuring out what an unknown bulb is.
Don

Gina said...

i found rabbit crap in my garden too! and a wholeeee lot more than this picture. it has blanketed an entire area - what do we do about it? I see now sign of my bulbs but now that you've had a sighting, I think I'd better run out and take another look.

Bek said...

I am also convinced that squirrels are eating bulbs, even when or after they were blooming. Last year I had a few grape hyacinths one day, just big wholes the next day. Last fall I tried to put the bulbs in front of the house, were I have not seen squirrels yet. Sofar it seems to work.

LCShores said...

I think that may be squirrel crap, since that's what my backyard looks like too (without any bulbs popping up yet, alas). We have bunnies, but we're far more generously endowed with squirrels....

Iowa Gardening Woman said...

Whatever kind of crap it is I have LOTS of it as well, how did they get under all that snow and ice to use my flower beds as an outhouse????

SuzyQ said...

Rabbit manure is actually very good for your garden - great fertilizer! Just mix it deeper into your soil.

Rabbit manure used as a plant fertilizer is superior to other manures due to its unique composition. Often referred to as "super fertilizer" or "Bunny Gold," gardeners revel in the fast and abundant growth of their crops, plants, gardens and produce. When the manure has been aged and air-dried, rabbit manure will not "burn" the plants when applied directly to the plants.